New Interpretation Planned for Vietnam POW Artifacts on Display in Cold War Gallery

With the support of the Naval Historical Foundation, valuable contextual interpretation is being developed for artifact display cases located in the South Hall of the Cold War Gallery of the National Museum of the United States Navy. On display within these glass cases are Vietnam Prisoner of War artifacts including boxer shorts dotted with red hearts, a shoulder board, sandals, a chess set, cigarettes, soap, toothpaste, a toothbrush, and textbooks.

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BOOK REVIEW – The Captain Who Burned His Ships: Captain Thomas Tingey, USN, 1750-1829
By Gordon S. Brown Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, (2011).
Reviewed by John Grady
Thomas Tingey was not a giant among the officers of the early American Navy, but his career as a midshipman in the Royal Navy sailing to Newfoundland and the Caribbean with few prospects of promotion, as a merchantman during and after the Revolution and American naval officer provides a useful framework to measure the struggles inside the administrations of the new republic with its Navy and what role it should play.
(read the full review)

BOOK REVIEW – The Captain Who Burned His Ships: Captain Thomas Tingey, USN, 1750-1829


By Gordon S. Brown Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, (2011).

Reviewed by John Grady

Thomas Tingey was not a giant among the officers of the early American Navy, but his career as a midshipman in the Royal Navy sailing to Newfoundland and the Caribbean with few prospects of promotion, as a merchantman during and after the Revolution and American naval officer provides a useful framework to measure the struggles inside the administrations of the new republic with its Navy and what role it should play.

(read the full review)

On 22 January 1800 Captain Thomas Tingey was was appointed to lay out and command the new Washington Navy Yard. He is best known as the man who carried out the order from the Secretary of the Navy to burn the Navy Yard in advance of the British attack on Washington in 1814 during the War of 1812. NHHC image NH 43038-KN.

On 11 December 1954, the U.S. Navy’s first supercarrier USS Forrestal (CVA 59) was launched at Newport News, VA. The massive builder’s model of Forrestal is on display in the Cold War Gallery, at the Washington Navy Yard. Details on how to visit can be found here: usnavymuseum.org

On October 2 1799, the Washington Navy Yard was established in Washington, D.C. The Navy Yard is our home, alongside the Naval History and Heritage Command and the National Museum of the United States Navy. It is also the residence of the Chief of Naval Operations.

Space Shuttle Discovery, strapped to the back of a Boeing 747, passes over Washington Navy Yard on its final flight on the morning of 17 April 2012.

USS Constitution Interactive Display Dedicated at National Navy Museum

On Monday 12 March, a new interactive display was dedicated at the U.S. Navy Museum at the Washington Navy Yard, Washington, D.C. The touch screen driven display gives museum visitors a chance to learn about the history of the commanding officers of the historic frigate USS Constitution. It was the brainchild of Dr. Jack London, Chairman of the Board of CACI International, Inc. London is a 1959 graduate of the United States Naval Academy, who served 12 years active duty as a naval aviator, and retired as a Captain from the Naval Reserve in 1983. He also happens to be a descendant of Constitution‘s first commanding officer, Captain Samuel Nicholson.

(read the full story here)

(images of personnel in attendance courtesy U.S. Navy, MC2 Gina K. Morrissette)